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Interior Care

As our motto states, "We Grow Quality in Quantity" ; nurturing our plants, palms and trees from germination to pot, to ground.

 

From Our House To Yours... Here are some tips to ensure your plant purchase stays top-quality.

*Availability of plants listed will vary.

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Anthuriums

-Location:  If given enough light indoors, anthuriums may continue to grow and flower. The ideal location is in a bright room or near a window.

 

-Irrigation:  Severe root rot may develop if plants are kept too wet, so let the medium dry before watering.

 

-Grooming:  Anthuriums are susceptible to spider mites and mealy bugs, inspect for pests periodically. Wiping dust from leaves and flowers will discourage them.

 

-Fertilizing:  One-half teaspoon of soluble 20-20-20 per gallon every three months or so should be sufficient indoors. It also helps to add the same amount of Epsom salts as well.

Areca

-Location:  Thrives best under relatively bright light or curtained filtered light.

 

-Irrigation:  Avoid over watering as well as watering with salty or fluoridated water. Let potting medium become fairly dry before watering.

 

-Grooming:  Prune dry fronds and wipe dust from leaves to discourage spider mites.

 

-Fertilizing:  Fertilize approximately every three to four months with a general purpose fertilizer as close to a 3:1:2 ratio as possible. Add some magnesium (Epsom salts) to help greening.

 

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Dieffenbachia 

-Location: Lives well in bright indirect light or curtained filtered sunlight, but can tolerate less, but tends to stretch severely with time.

 

-Irrigation: Water thoroughly at first, then let the soil dry almost to the bottom of the pot before irrigating thoroughly again.  Avoid getting foliage wet with watering.  It may help to set the pot on a saucer of moistened pebbles or gravel so as to increase the humidity around the plant.

 

-Fertilizing:  Approximately four months after purchase, fertilize occasionally with soluble 20-20-20 at about 2 teaspoons per gallon of water.

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Phoenix Roebelinii

-Location: Phoenix palms do better with as much light as you can give them in the interior environment. New growth becomes stretched and weak over time if light is inadequate.

 

-Irrigation: Allow this plant to dry slightly between thorough waterings. Do not let water accumulate in the saucer.

 

-Fertilizing: Do not fertilize unless you have adequate light for reasonably normal growth. When fertilizing, use no more than a teaspoon of soluble 20-20-20 per gallon, plus ¼ -½ teaspoon Epsom salts. 

 

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Dracaena Reflexa

-Location: Tolerates low light levels, but thrives best under slightly brighter conditions.

-Irrigation: It is best to let these plants dry a bit between waterings.  They do tolerate moisture extremes pretty well, but if the plants get too dry, tip burn in likely to develop.  If the plants are too wet, the leaves become chlorotic (yellow) and thin.

-Fertilizing:  Fertilize very sparingly with soluble

20-20-02 or 20-10-20 every three to four months.  Try to avoid fluoridated tap water; well water or tap is best.

Syngonium

-Location: Bright indirect light is best, as leaf variegation generally decreases in most varieties under low light.

 

-Irrigation: Try to keep the soil moisture levels fairly constant, as Sygoniums do not like to dry out too much.

 

-Fertilizing: If light levels are good, you can fertilize every two months with one teaspoon of soluble 20-20-20 per gallon. In low light it is best to keep fertility levels low, or the plants may develop weak growth with poor colour.  

 

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Rhapis Excelsa

-Location: Thrives best in a room with bright indirect light, although they can tolerate lower light levels. They also seem to prefer slightly cooler locations.

 

-Irrigation: Allow plants to get reasonably dry between thorough waterings, generally two to four times per month. Rain water or water low in fluoride is best. Do not allow water to accumulate in the saucer, or root rot will likely occur.

 

-Grooming: Dust leaves occasionally, or use a leaf shine product to enhance the appearance of the plant. Occasionally trim off older browning leaves at the base.

 

-Fertilizing: One-half teaspoon of soluble 20-20-20 per gallon every four to five months or so should be sufficient indoors, as long as there is enough light available. Include iron in the fertilizer once in a while

 

 

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Aglaonema

-Location: An excellent indoor plant, Aglaonemas will withstand low light levels, but bright indirect or curtained filtered light will allow the plant to grow for many years.

 

-Irrigation: Water about once a week as Aglaonemas prefer moist conditions, however, if plants sit in water for extended periods, root rot might occur.

 

-Grooming: Clean older leaves periodically by lifting up the foliage to see under the plant.

 

-Fertilizing:  Fertilize approximately every 3 months with a teaspoon of a general- purpose soluble fertilizer such as 20-20-20, plus ½ teaspoon of Epsom salts per gallon of water.

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Bromeliads

-Location: Bromeliads can tolerate low to medium light levels, however humidity must be relatively high for them to do well.

 

-Irrigation: On the inside, don’t try to keep the cups wet all the time. It is best to water when the medium is dry, and splash only a little in the cups. Change water periodically by turning the plant upside down.

 

-Fertilizing: Do not fertilize if light levels are low. In higher lit areas use ⅓ tea-spoon soluble 20-20-20 per gallon of water every month.

 

Sanseviera

-Location: Some direct sun is okay, but filtered light is best. Will actually tolerate moderate or even low levels of light.

 

-Irrigation: A very easy plant to care for. Sansevieras can take a lot of neglect, but for best results, water once a month and let them dry out.

 

-Fertilizing: Not necessary. If desired, Sanseviera should be fertilized with nitrogen-free fertilizer only, and during summer months

 

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Japanese Fan Palm

-Location: Most palms thrive best under relatively bright, natural light. The Japanese fan palm prefers indirect light. On a patio, or near a window would be best. 

-Irrigation: Palms in containers need consistent moisture, not soggy soils Pour out any excess water that may be collected in the saucer, so the palms roots aren't standing in moisture. Allow the first 2 inches of soil to slightly dry out between waterings.

 

-Fertilizing: Palm trees are very sensitive to build-ups of fertilizer salts in the soil. Fertilize with slow-release granular fertilzer 2-3 times a year. Use a dose of 3:2:1 ratio general fertilizer if possible. Add some magnesium to help greening. 

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Schefflera 'Amate'

-Location: Scheffleras make reasonably good interior plants and can be kept in low light conditions for extended periods. However, they do best in slightly brighter light. 

-Irrigation: It is best to let Scheffleras wilt slightly before watering than to risk over-watering, which rots roots and kills the plant. When plants are stressed from lack of water, spider mite activity can be heightened.

 

-Fertilizing: Fertilize three to four times per year, with a teaspoon of soluble 20-20-20 per gallon of water.

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Crotons

-Location:  Thrives best under bright indirect sunlight. Some cultivars will tolerate less light.

 

-Irrigation:  Water thoroughly and allow to dry slightly between waterings. If allowed to dry too much, then leaf drop might occur. Never allow plant to sit in water.

 

-Grooming:  Responds well to leaf shine products.

Watch for spider mite activity and spray if mites are

observed.

 

-Fertilizing:  Crotons need somewhat more fertilizer than most interior plants. Apply soluble 24-8-16 or

20-20-20 every six weeks or so. Add potassium nitrate to help improve the colour intensity, regardless of light level.

 

Cordilyne (Ti Plant)

-Location: Ti plants are rather well adapted to low-light interior situations; however, the colour tends to improve as the light level is increased.

 

-Irrigation: Plants should be kept evenly moist, avoiding extremes in either direction.  Collected rainwater is probably the best source of water, as fluoride in the tap water tends to burn the leaf tips.

 

Fertilizing:  Use a general-purpose soluble fertilizer such as 20-20-20 plus a little magnesium sulphate and potassium nitrate, for colour, every three to four months or less if in low light.

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Ferns

-Location: Ferns in general don’t like dry heat.  They actually prefer a moist, cool, slightly clammy environment.  They tend to do fairly well in low light; however, they do best in a brighter location.

 

-Irrigation: Mainly steady, consistent moisture levels, avoiding extremes in either direction.  It is best to allow the water to run through the medium to avoid the accumulation of soluble salts.  Do not let ferns go significantly dry.

 

-Fertilizing:  Fertilize every three to four months with a teaspoon of a general-purpose soluble fertilizer such as 20-20-20.  Add ½ teaspoon Epsom salts per gallon of water to that mix.

 

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Philodendron

-Location: Tolerates low light levels, but thrives best under bright indirect or curtained filtered light. Also performs well under interior lighting

 

-Irrigation: Allow the potting medium to dry slightly between waterings. Rest pot on a tray or saucer of moistened pebbles so as to increase humidity around the plant.

 

-Grooming: Dust leaves occasionally, or use a leaf shine product to enhance the appearance of the plant. Aerial roots may be removed if they are unsightly.

 

-Fertilizing:  Fertilize lightly, approximately two to three times per year, with a teaspoon of soluble 20-20-20, plus ½ teaspoon Epsom salts per gallon of water.

 

 

Spathiphyllum

-Location: Tolerates low light levels, but thrives best under bright indirect or curtained filtered light. Also performs well under interior lighting.

 

-Irrigation: Requires fairly frequent watering, but not over-watering. It is best to allow plants to wilt slightly before watering. If plants sit in water for extended periods, root rot might occur.

 

-Grooming: Dust leaves occasionally, or use a leaf shine product to enhance the appearance of the plant.

 

-Fertilizing:  Fertilize approximately every two months with a teaspoon of a general- purpose soluble fertilizer such as 20-20-20, plus ½ teaspoon of Epsom salts per gallon of water.

 

Dracaena Marginata

-Location: Thrives best in a bright room, although they can tolerate slightly lower light levels. However, plants may lose older leaves if levels are too low.

 

-Irrigation: Allow plants to dry between thorough waterings. Do not allow water to accumulate in the saucer, or root rot will likely occur.

 

-Grooming: Dust leaves occasionally, or use a leaf shine product to enhance the appearance of the plant.

 

-Fertilizing: One-half teaspoon of soluble 20-20-20 per gallon every two to three months or so should be sufficient indoors, as long as there is enough light available. Include trace elements in the fertilizer.

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Bamboo Palm

-Location:  Bamboo palms are quite durable under low light conditions. They do need some filtered light to retain their quality.

 

-Irrigation:  Try to keep the soil evenly moist, but absolutely do not over water.

 

-Grooming:  Prune dry fronds and bloom spikes to reduce leaf drop.

 

-Fertilizing:  Fertilize approximately every four to five months with one teaspoon per gallon 20-20-20 general-purpose fertilizer.

Calathea

-Location: Calatheas can tolerate lower light than many foliage plants. Leaf colour will improve as light levels are increased.

 

-Irrigation: Moisten the soil well, then let the plant dry down somewhat before watering again. Do not allow water to remain in the saucer. Overwatering and elevated soluble salts are the most common reasons for plant loss in Calatheas.

 

-Fertilizing: Apply fertilizer sparingly, preferably from soluble 24-8-16.

Dracaena Punctulata Surculosa 

-Location: Tolerates low light levels, but thrives best under brighter conditions. 

 

-Irrigation: It is best to let these plants dry a bit between waterings. They do tolerate moisture extremes pretty well, but if the plant gets too dry, top burn is likely to develop. If the plants are too wet, the leaves become yellowed ant thin.

 

-Fertilizing: Fertilize very sparingly with soluble 20-20-20 or 20-10-20 every three to four months. Try avoid flourided tap water; well water or tap water is best.

 

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Ficus Lyrata

-Location: Thrives best in bright conditions. Give it bright consistent lighting, preferably by a sunny window. Turn the plant with every watering to ensure light is even

 

-Irrigation: Keep the potting medium moist, but not wet. Allow the surface to dry between waterings.

 

-Fertilizing: Fertilize with a water-soluble plant food throughout the growing season according to directions.

 

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Fishtail Palm

-Location: For interiors, filtered sun or bright indirect lighting is preferred.

 

-Irrigation: Let soil dry down a fair amount, then water thoroughly. Iron chlorosis develops if the soil is too moist or the roots are struggling.

 

-Fertilizing: One ⅓ teaspoon of soluble 20-20-20 per gallon plus a small amount of Epsom salts every three to four months should be sufficient indoors. Fishtails can be quite tall, so aggressive fertilization is discouraged. 

 

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White Bird of Paradise

-Location: Give White Bird of Paradise enough light indoors. The ideal location is in a bright room or near a window.

 

-Irrigation: Maintain steady soil moisture, but do not over water. Severe root rot may develop if plants are kept too wet.

 

-Fertilizing: One ⅓ teaspoon of soluble 20-20-20 per gallon plus a small amount of Epsom salts every one to two months should be sufficient indoors as long as there is enough light available. In lower light situations, not as much fertilizer is needed.

 

Green Plants for Greener Spaces

Did you know that plants in the interior reduce health problems and stress? This is reflected in a significant reduction in absence due to illness and an improvement in the performance and the productivity of employees. These are excellent reasons for making your workplace greener and  healthier.
These are the plants with the highest rating; according to ease of growth and maintenance, resistance to pests, efficiency at removing chemical toxins from air, and transpiration rates; along with tolerance to indoor environments, and of course, their popularity and beauty.

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Ficus Alii

This Ficus’ slender dark green leaves make it a very attractive plant. It is much less finicky than the Ficus Lyrata. Like all species of Ficus, expect some leaf-drop until the plant adjusts to its new location. A magnificent large plant, its ability to help purify the air, ease of growth and resistance to insects make it an excellent choice for your home or office space!

Sansevieria

A classic houseplant and easiest of all easy plants, able to adapt to most any condition or environment. Leaves become fuller and bandings become more pronounced in medium light levels. Occasionally, sanseviera may reward you with a tall and dainty sweet smelling flower stalk.

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Spathiphyllum

An outstanding foliage plant that also produces flowers, the Peace Lily possesses all the qualities to make it one of the best indoor plants. Its ability to remove air pollutants and its excellent performance in all categories make it a most valuable plant! 

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Ferns

Phoenix roebelinii or Dwarf Date Palm

 Ferns are probably one of the oldest groups of plants. It is best displayed in hanging pot or sitting upon a pedestal. Of the plants tested, it is the best for removing air pollutants, especially formaldehyde, and for adding humidity to the indoor environment (perfect for your cool office space)

A slow-grower, is best seen when given adequate space and is impressive standing alone, especially when given spot-lighting. When its environmental needs are met, this date palm can survive for decades! It is one of the best palms for removing indoor air pollutants and is especially effective for removal of xylene. 

Areca Palms

One of the most popular palms utilized for tropical decor. Tolerant of the indoors, the Areca is consistently rated among the best houseplants for removing all indoor air toxins tested. This plant can be kept best in semi-sun.
Fort George Botanicals are the island’s largest growers of Areca Palms!

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Bamboo Palms

Most members of the palm family are easy to care for and continue to be popular houseplants. The Bamboo palm is of no exception and is a long-standing favourite of commercial establishments. With an excellent overall rating and one of the highest transpiration ratings! 

Rhapis or Lady Palms

Another popular and graceful palm: - This large palm has 6-12in wide fans that consist of 4-10 thick shiny leaves. It is one of the easiest houseplants to care for and is highly resistant to most pests. The Lady palm is also one of the best plants for improving air quality! It grows slowly, is easy to maintain and is best kept in bright shade.

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